From permalinks

Hands-on Clay Plaster Workshop 3/10/18, Fallbrook, CA

Come and learn about natural clay plasters in a fun, supportive environment while helping to plaster a tiny strawbale building. During this one-day workshop, we will mix and install the base coat of clay plaster – also know as earth plaster – to the strawbale and straw-clay walls of an adorable 120 square foot building. The class will be a mix of talking about building and hands-on doing. This is a rare opportunity to participate in a real build where your safety and education are the primary focus.

click to see an animation of the building you’ll be working on

No previous experience with construction is required. All tools will be provided for your use during the class. Taught by Rebecca Tasker and Mike Long, general contractors and co-owners of Simple Construct Naturally Healthy Homes.

These workshops fill up quickly, so register soon. We will provide water and light snacks, you will be responsible for bringing your own lunch. Address will be provided with registration.


Here’s what former workshop attendees said about our workshops:

“Perfect amount of students. Easy to understand. Excellent presentation. Very knowledgeable instructors. Would highly recommend the workshops.” – A.C.

“It was a great experience– you guys have so much knowledge and passion for what you do and I appreciated the opportunity to learn from you.” – M.B.

“I loved the size of the workshops and how they were presented. Very easy to grasp the principles as they were presented. There was always time for questions and they were all answered honestly I feel. I felt that a great deal of consideration was given in the planning of the classes and there is nothing I can think of that I would want different. The information was extremely well presented. Both contractors were always very willing to answer questions and were very forthcoming with information. Often when attending this sort of thing there is a feeling coming from the people giving the class that they are better than those of us who do not know enough yet. I never once got the feeling like that from the contractors at this class. They were always very much interested in our needs and perception of the material.” – K.W.

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Tiny Houses are now legal in San Diego, just ditch the wheels

 

People are understandably excited about the new Accessory Dwelling Unit regulations that went into effect last year here in California that override local ordinances and allow most homeowners to build a detached “granny flat” of up to 1,200 sq feet no matter how small the main house is. ADUs used to be limited to 50% of the size of the main house, so if you had an 800 sq ft house, the largest ADU you could build was 400 sq ft. Not anymore! As long as you can meet the setbacks and other requirements, you can build (and legally rent out) an ADU as large as 1,200 sq ft. That’s not tiny: that’s a 2 bedroom house with closets and enough room for a separate kitchen, dining table, and living room.

But some of us are more interested in tiny. One aspect of this legislation that hasn’t gotten as much attention is the new minimum size allowed. Previous regulations governing the minimum size of rooms meant that the smallest you could legally build a house was between 400-600 sq ft, depending on interpretation. This new legislation drops that to a minimum of 150 sq ft. That’s a Tiny House! A legal, rentable Tiny House.

A beautiful Tumbleweed Tiny House on wheels ©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

When you say “Tiny House,” most people visualize one of those photogenic houses on wheels. Tiny Houses have become a phenomenon, a movement – maybe even a bit of a fad – and they are almost always shown on wheels.

Personally, I’ve never understood the need for wheels, except for being able to move the Tiny House if you get caught in the grey area of where you are or are not allowed to park a Tiny House on wheels. To some, the wheels are the solution to the problem but to me, the wheels can sometimes be the problem.

A Tiny House on a foundation

For some people, the wheels are important: they are about not being tied down, having the freedom to go wherever they want to go. But you might wonder why you would want to be able to move so easily? What about building community and putting down roots? And is it really that easy to drag a miniature house from place to place and negotiate finding water, electricity, and a place to put the wastes? With wheels, the questions are “Is it an RV or is it a mobile home?” “How does it connect to the necessary services?” “How does it connect to the ground in an earthquake or hurricane?”

If you are one of the people willing to let go of the wheels, that one aspect of the Tiny House as it has come to be known, you can now rejoice in how much more realistic and legal and likely and doable they have just become thanks to this awesome new law.

Yes, you’ll need a foundation and sewer (or septic) and water service and electrical service. But the upside is that you’ll have a foundation and sewer (or septic) and water service and electrical service. You will no longer be limited to what you can fit on a trailer or what is light enough to be towed, a consideration that usually precludes the use of most natural materials. Yes, you will need to own land (or make an agreement with someone who does). Yes, it will cost more to have this infrastructure but the upside is that you will have that infrastructure and you will have the legal right to live in or rent out your Tiny House.

Contact us to talk about the exciting possibilities for your property.

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Fallgren Strawbale Home receives Net Zero Energy certification through Living Building Challenge

On Jan 3, 2018, the Fallgren Home in Campo, CA, became the second building in Southern California to be awarded “Net Zero Energy Building” status through the Living Building Challenge. This third-party certification is based on actual performance data and verifies that the building uses less energy than it produces annually, as well as meets the program’s criteria for sensitive development, beauty, and education.

California has set a goal that all new residential buildings will be Zero Energy by 2020. This house is one example of how we can meet that goal using carbon-sequestering, non-toxic materials that are better for people and the environment.

Super-insulation, thoughtful design and careful construction mean that this home stays a comfortable temperature year round in this extreme climate while using little energy. The smaller than the average photovoltaic solar array (4.1 kW) provides almost twice as much electricity as this home uses even though every system in the home is electric (no gas or propane).

“When it was cold this winter, the house stayed at about 70° without any heat. When it got hot this summer, the house stayed at about 74° without air conditioning. It’s a very comfortable house.” – Brian Fallgren, Homeowner

This home is one of only 27 in the world to achieve this certification through the International Living Future Institute, a nonprofit working to build an ecologically-minded, restorative world for all people. Using principles of social and environmental justice, ILFI seeks to counter climate change by pushing for an urban environment free of fossil fuels. ILFI runs the Living Building Challenge, which is the world’s most rigorous green building standard, as well as the Net Zero Energy Building Certification (now Zero Energy), the Living Product Challenge, and the Living Community Challenge. The ILFI NZEB certification draws from the Living Building Challenge and is a highly rigorous and regarded standard in its own right.

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